Garaventa Lift Continuing Education Program Nets Award

Award-from-Architectural-Record

Garaventa Lift Continuing Education Program wins Prestigious Award

Today we extend our appreciation to Bill Madden and the crew at Architectural Record for honoring us with a prestigious Excellence in Advertising Award for 2016. Our Continuing Education Program entitled Accessibility, Safety and Platform Lifts and Elevators is one of three 2016 winners in the Top Interactive Continuing Education Category. The course is hosted online at the Architectural Record Continuing Education Center.

Australian LULA Elevator Captures May POM

Congratulations to our friends down under at PR King & Sons. They have captured the Garaventa Lift Project of the Month for May, 2016.

Limited use limited application elevator has glass doors

LULA Elevator with Glass Doors

ThisLimited use limited application elevator with glass doors is an installation of an Elvoron LULA limited use limited application elevator, made by Garaventa Lift and installed by P.R. King & Sons. The application showcases the optional glass 2-speed sliding doors.

The building is the Eileen O’Connor Catholic College in Lewisham, Australia.

Eileen Rosaline O’Connor was an Australian Nun, who devoted her life in service to those less fortunate. In 1913, she founded the Society of Our Lady’s Nurses for the Poor from the bedroom of her home in Coogee.

Remarkably, she sustained a serious back injury when she was only three years old, resulting in a lifelong disability and constant pain. She was only 28 years old when she died. She may not have lived a long lifetime, but her example continues to inspire others today. She is considered a counted Servant of God, meaning that she is under consideration by the Catholic Church for possible canonization into sainthood.

The institution bearing her name has as one of its aims, “to provide a stimulating education designed to develop the whole student that enriches them socially, emotionally, physically, intellectually, creatively, morally and spiritually.”  We are proud that the people in charge of the college chose Garaventa Lift and PR King & Sons to provide their new LULA Elevator.

Public Accessibility

In this article, we examine public accessibility for people with disabilities. How did the movement towards a more accessible society begin?  First, let’s get some perspective.

On July 26, 1990, at a signing ceremony at the White House, President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act. Since then, awareness of the ADA requirements and compliance with them has become universal in new commercial construction. There is no doubt that this legislation has had a profound effect on the business of manufacturing, installing and servicing accessibility equipment.

However, this law did not represent the beginning of the trend towards greater public accessibility. The seeds for that were planted much earlier by shifts in public policy and the laws enacted to ban discrimination based on race, ethnic origin and gender. This was followed by similar legislation way back in 1973 which banned discrimination on the basis of disability by recipients of federal funds.

This really meant that, for the first time ever, society began to take responsibility for providing greater inclusion of people with disabilities. Before that, the prevailing thought was that the exclusion of people with disabilities was a direct consequence of their own limitations. (Mayerson, 1992)

By the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, the Disability Rights movement had sprouted with the founding of the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund which continues to provide a voice for the rights of the disabled today.

Increasing awareness and legislation was followed by the transformation of thousands of existing public places to allow for accessibility. This continues today; many publicly owned buildings in smaller communities remain inaccessible.

Through the 1980’s and 90’s, the use of platform lifts for wheelchairs started to become more widespread. The Safety Standard used as a basis for state safety regulations, ASME A17.1 became A18.1 in 1999. This separated the requirements for wheelchair platform lifts from the requirements for passenger elevators, which remain under A17.1. As the A18.1 has become further refined, it has been adopted as a safety standard for accessibility equipment by virtually every state in the USA.

dangerous-ramp-down-to-officesIn the early days, accessibility equipment was considered by some as the ugly stepchild of the elevator industry.  These were lighter-duty elevating devices that, when examined under the scrutiny of legislation intended for passenger elevators, could not possibly stack up. In some cases, the equipment was poorly designed to begin with. Now, the accessibility industry has matured, the equipment is better understood, and the solutions provided are legitimate, code-compliant and safe.

102_0238For the future, we will continue to see accessibility equipment used to provide solutions in commercial and public places. We are also seeing an upward trend with residential accessibility. As “Aging in Place” and “Universal Design” have now become common terms for designers of new homes, so has the use of residential elevators and stair lifts.